Monday, August 18, 2014

Arguing to Win

Here's a link to "Arguing to Win," which posted this morning on 3 Quarks Daily.  Enjoy!

Thursday, August 14, 2014

On Monday at 3QD: Arguing to Win

Aikin and Talisse's summer hiatus is coming to a close, and they have a post coming on Monday at 3 Quarks Daily about "Arguing to Win."  A link will appear here on Monday. 

Monday, May 26, 2014

Friday, May 23, 2014

Coming on Monday to 3QD: Semantics and Pragmatics

Aikin and Talisse have a piece that will appear on Monday at 3 Quarks Daily about "Semantics and Pragmatics."  We'll post the link on Monday.  Here's the opening paragraph:
Ernie: “Is it possible you’ll be around after lunch for a quick chat?”
Bert: “Yes.”
Ernie: “Ok.  I’ll see you then.”
Bert: “Wait, wait!  I didn’t say I’d be around after lunch!”
Ernie: “What the heck?!?!”

This is a case of a conversational misfire, and although errors of this kind are the central ingredients of the humor of people like Woody Allen, Larry David, and Lewis Carroll, such misfires can create a good deal of argumentative and philosophical confusion.  Let’s start with a quick diagnosis of the misfire above, then we’ll identify why this kind of misfire is common.  We’ll finish by pointing to a few philosophical lessons.

Monday, May 12, 2014

Parnassus Books Event

Aikin and Talisse had a great time on Friday night talking about Why We Argue (And How We Should) at Parnassus Books in Nashville. Here are a few pictures from the event.  Many thanks to all who attended and participated in the discussion. 




Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Book Launch!


On Friday, May 9, at 6:30pm, there will be a book launch event at Parnassus Books in Nashville for Why We Argue.

Aikin and Talisse will give a short presentation about the book, which will be followed by discussion and book signing.  Light refreshments will be served.  If you're in or around Nashville, please join them!  

Friday, March 28, 2014

WWA Reviewed

Why We Argue has just been reviewed in The Australian
This is a clear and lucid book, and if its authors tend at times to talk as if naked demagoguery, deception and wilful blindness to the facts are incidental to politics, as opposed to part of its DNA, this is only because they are putting forward an ideal version of democracy in which we all have the potential to become philosophers.

Taken in that spirit, Why We Argue is a fascinating contribution to an important field.